November 22, 2011

Peer Book Report: The Interior Designer's Guide to Pricing, Estimating, and Budgeting by Theo Stephan Williams



 The Interior Designer's Guide to Pricing, Estimating, and Budgeting by Theo Stephan Williams

As students at Pratt, design is a heavy component in our education. Regardless of major, most of the content of our class critiques is dictated by the level of creativity in the designs pinned up on the wall. For certain majors, though, design is only the beginning of what's required to be a successful industry professional. Interior design is a division of the market that is just as dependent upon project and budget management as it is on design. Williams' book not only drives this point home, but provides so much valuable information and aids, including:
  • Interviews with working professionals on their experiences and life lessons
  • Different formats of Budgeting and Estimation Forms
  • How to send out a Purchase Order or Work Change Order
  • Samples of how to keep Purchase Logs
  • Multiple sample contracts as well as contract advice
  • Client Approval Forms, as well as what they are and why they're important!
 To see other books in our library, see our collection at http://www.librarything.com/catalog/prattcareer.

November 21, 2011

Frances Waite & Lauren Smith, "Diluted", Two Person Show in the Alcove Gallery


  Review by Janine Sleem, History of Art and Design Graduate Student (2013)

         Memory, our ability to store and recollect, is shared. How well we are able to recollect them varies. Diluted, currently on view at the Alcove Gallery, is a collaborative exploration of memory and its recollection by first year student Frankie Waite and second year graduate student Lauren Smith.
Frances Waite, "Sister in the Water" 2011
   Waite captures intimate, candid family portraits, blurred, discolored and overexposed, as if snapshots from memory rather than film. The rocky cliffs and crystal waters of the Aruba coastline act as the setting for an unexpected transcendental experience, inviting us to peer into the sublime haze of figures in high places and deep waters.
             Old habits die hard for Waite, whose affinity for painting reveals itself in her photography. She takes to manipulating the medium as she does watercolor and ink, exposing the film to the sunlight and salt water rather than altering it digitally. The results appear to have been painted by the natural elements they portray. The exposure reveals both the vulnerability of the grainy film, and that of Waite's own memory. Waite reinforces the authenticity of the moment by allowing us to not only see the events unfold as she did, but to experience the blanks that her mind's eye and her camera's lens failed to capture and preserve.
            While the water is a trigger and an applied medium for Frankie Waite's memories and photographs respectively, for Lauren Smith, the ocean waves are the subject matter she attempts to remember and the culprit in denying her the ability to do so. Pixelated waters and white noise dilute the memories that Smith struggles to recapture.
Lauren Smith, "Untitled", 2011
            Smith, a New Forms major, focuses on projected video installations, including what she describes as 'memory videos', from which her sequence of exhibited images were taken. The videos are created by heavily editing existing films that correspond to her own recollected memories. Smith alters the videos, including the audio, exposure and lighting, timing, and sequence of frames to correspond to the process of evoking a memory. She then captured four images that best represent this process for the Alcove Gallery showing.
            Like Waite, Smith ventures into the realm of fading memories using the natural elements of the scene, an attempt to fill in the forgotten with the familiar; Waite through the use of the actual elements, and Smith through digital manipulation. Smith's work, however, exhibits a self-awareness that Waite's work does not, a realization that the image is only a temporary recollection, a realization that is met with a heavy resistance.
            Diluted addresses the very human concern of passing time, ephemeral memories, and ultimately, our own ephemeral existence.



This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.

Yiji Hong, "Something Between Nothing", Solo Show in the Fishbowl Gallery

Review by Sophie Buonomo, History of Art and Design Graduate Student (2013)
"Remains", 2010, gloves, canvas, charcoal powder

    Yiji Hong’s solo show, on view in the Fishbowl Gallery, is simple, spare, and conceptually lovely. A visitor to the Fishbowl Gallery might not even realize immediately that there is even a show on display – Hong’s work is quiet, and calls little attention to itself. However, this subtlety belies an energy and even a playfulness that becomes evident as one considers the work.

On display is the evidence of a performance called Vanishing (which will soon be in video form on her website, www.yijihong.com). In this performance, Hong shifts black powder from one sheet of paper to another. The effect is two-fold – first, the physical evidence of the shift (that is, a streak of black powder) remains on each sheet. Second, with each shift, there is less powder, and the marks become lighter and lighter. However, the powder never fully disappears, which, for Hong, represents the failure of the artist to fully transcend her materials.

Hong turns material into art, and the evidence of her artistic process becomes the artwork itself.  In the gallery, we encounter a bag of scrap paper, powder-blackened gloves, and a rusty lock box. In this lock box, hidden from our eyes, lays torn paper – the evidence of Hong destroying her art at the end of the process. For all of this conceptual gravitas, there is lightness in the physicality of the work - the delicateness of the powder, and the simple exploration of material interaction.

detail from "Container", 2010,mixed media
Hong describes her anxiety as an artist, which she feels     stems from the question: “how do I overcome the white sheet of paper?” The tension between an artist and her materials is nothing new, to be sure. Yet, Hong’s process, at once both meditative and witty, infuses this difficult and ancient relationship with an enormous amount of light.







 


Exhibition Photos by Lauren Smith

This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.




Kelly Mc Cafferty, "Trash Talk", Solo Show in East One Gallery

Review by Leigh Hurwitz, History of Art and Design/ Library Sciences Graduate Student (2012)

 
detail from "Stalagmite Stalactite", 2011, collage on paper
Ranging in size, but hovering around 6 ft x 3 ft, the five collages making up Kelly McCafferty’s current exhibit in East One Gallery vibrate with the strains of a choir of disparate voices.  McCafferty's background in abstract painting is clear in these compositions, made of paper, plastic, and bought/found items, all adhered to pink or white paper canvases, evocative of a grade school bulletin board.  But emotion, memory, and nostalgia are all refracted through the prism of colorful formalism.

Stopping short of fetishism, these collages make the case for objects themselves having a memory, a personal history.  There is a desolate sadness radiating around each one, from the anachronistic Roger Rabbit collector cards to the piece of tessellated Japanese paper with one small red stain. A codified arrangement of bisected shopping bags, musical silhouetted rabbits, already-peeled Sanrio stickers, and patterns of tape (caution, packing, duck, scotch) are aligned to suggest a record of…someone.  An alien finding consolation on an unfamiliar planet?  


  
detail from "Thanks a Bunch", 2011, collage
A post-apocalyptic anthropologist?  Or are these the rainbow residues of a teenage girl vomiting up a buffet of consumer culture, the proverbial assumption of feminine sweetness, and the unstoppable force of growing up? 

These are all my interpretations, however the true protagonist is actually the artist herself.  A scrapbook, a locker, an under-the-bed shoebox of treasures, are all containers that inspire this diaristic work.   So what was that chorus of lo-fi keening I heard emanating from each panel?  I think it was the crooning of each dislocated object, mourning its own loss and yearning for amnesia.


Photos by Lauren Smith




This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.









November 2, 2011

Lucia Oceguera, "Recollection", Solo Show in East One Gallery

Review by Clara Wanatirta, History of Art and Design Graduate Student (2012)



"Knot in Throat/ Nudo en la Garganta", 2011, video
The broad nature of New Forms opens up a door to endless possibilities. This is
certainly true for MFA student Lucia Oceguera’s exhibition, titled Recollection,
currently displayed at the EastOne Gallery on the first floor of the East Building.
Oceguera has faith in non‐traditional media such as the readymade and video,
seeing little boundaries to their capabilities as tools of expression. Her working
method is flexible, allowing her materials to speak and develop ideas into concrete,
multi‐layered manifestations shown in her final products.
Recollection displays Oceguera’s intention for the liberation of her materials. For
example, physical qualities such as image reflection, found in the mirror in Untitled,
and texture in the grey bricks used in World of Opposites may act as an element in
symbol making or simply play an aesthetic role.

The beauty of the open‐ended nature of Oceguera’s work lies in the fact that theviewer creates his/her personalencounter with each art piece. There is neither
duplication nor monotony as the elements that compose the different pieces
function as parts of a bigger whole as well as their individual entities.
EastOne Gallery as a makeshift artistic venue (the space is formally the Career
Services office) fits Oceguera’s display concept well. Not only are her artworks open
to interpretation, they also work better in non‐traditional exhibition where thereare no dedicated facilities as a support system; Oceguera’s installations work with
any given setting, creating new meanings wherever and however they are displayed.

"World of Opposites", 2010, painted bricks
To Oceguera, this pop‐up method for exhibiting her work allows her, through the
artworks, to enter a person’s personal space without being invasive or perhaps even
consciously acknowledged. Oceguera is thoughtful in integrating her work into
everyday spaces and people’s preset knowledge and experience, making her a
unique artist who produces installation‐based artworks that reach out to a wide
range of audience.




Exhibition Photos by Lauren Smith


This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.