December 16, 2011

Career Coffee Break: Erwin Gorostiza



Erwin Gorostiza is a Pratt Alum working as the Creative Director at RCA Music Group. He graduated in 1988 with a B.F.A in Graphic Design and spoke with us about his experience in school and after he graduated.
Career Coffee Break is a program run by the Peer Counselors in the Peer to Peer Program in Pratt Institute's Office of Career Services. The Peer Counselors bring coffee to Pratt Alumni in their studio and interview them on what life is like after graduation.

If you are a Pratt Alumni and want to participate in this project, email success@pratt.edu and let them know how you take your coffee.

December 15, 2011

A Farewell from a Peer





















That's me on the right (front) with the fishface.

Hey guys! I'm Christee Curran, one of the Peers who updates the Pratt Success Blog, mostly doing the Peer Book Reports, where I review the career development books we have here in the Career Services Office at Pratt. I am graduating this semester, and I will be starting the New Year fresh out of school as a freelance illustrator. I'm a little scared, but very excited. I don't know exactly where I'll wind up, but wherever it may be, I'll work as hard as I can to get there. I am thankful for all of the connections with the friends, classmates, faculty, and staff members I have made over the past three and a half years (I transferred here from Rutgers MGSA). I also feel privileged to have been involved with the Career Services office from my very first week at Pratt, in September of 2008.

Now, as a "Super-Senior," I would like to offer some parting words of humble advice. It is not enough to go to Pratt and do your homework, counting down the days each semester when you know you will be met with either a Winter or Summer Break. Pratt is what you make of it, like anything else you will experience in your life. Those eight semesters will come one after the other and end sooner than you think, and once you're in the "real world" (I hate that term), you will find yourself reminiscing about the miserable all-nighters in studio and the cryptic crits of frazzling professors. My recommendation is to be proactive from the beginning: it starts with getting involved with campus clubs and organizations, but it can extend to getting involved with internships and jobs. The connections you forge here can have surprising rewards. They did for me, and I wouldn't change anything. Thanks for reading, and don't forget to stop by East One for some career counseling and a good book!

Best wishes and have a Happy New Year,

Christee

Peer Book Report: The Education of a Design Entrepreneur, edited by Steven Heller





















The Education of a Design Entrepreneur, edited by Steven Heller

Being a Designer often means being your own boss and running your own business. "Getting a job right out of school" was never a very common luxury, but it's less of a luxury in the present economic climate. But that doesn't mean Designers don't have the opportunity to succeed: being a self-starter is more important now than ever, and it is crucial to recognize that those who succeed are willing to take some risks and leaps of faith. Steven Heller explores this notion one-on-one with many successful Designers, some of whom are:


  • Stephan Van Dam, Mapmaker, Vandam's Digital Map Library in New York
  • David M. Kelley, CEO of IDEO
  • Ellen Shapiro, Principal of Ellen Shapiro Design
  • Maira Kalman, Cofounder of M&Co.
  • Gary Baseman, Illustrator and Creator of Teacher's Pet (a cartoon from the late 1990s)
  • Chip Kidd, Author and Designer
  • Jay Vigon, Graphic and Fashion Designer
  • Alexander Isley, Principal of Isley Design
  • David Volgner, Designer of "Gak" for Nickelodeon Consumer Products


This is just a small handful from the collection of Designers and their invaluable advice. There are over 250 pages here of help and encouragement. As cheesy as it sounds, you can learn the secrets of a lot of success stories.

December 8, 2011

Career Coffee Break: Judy Nylen



Judy Nylen, Director of Career Services 
Pratt Institute Alumna, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Library Science 


We bring you this special edition coffee break featuring our very own Director of Career Services, Judy Nylen. In honor of her time and achievements in the office, we met with Judy to talk about her experiences and plans for the future. As a former graduate student turned staff, Judy offers insightful advice about what it means to be an artist that only experience can give. 


Thank you Judy for making the Career Services office what it is today and guiding many students in the direction of their own careers! 



December 6, 2011

Career Coffee Break: Wennie Huang

Pratt Institute Alumnus, Bachelors in Fine Arts, 1994
We met up with Wennie Huang and talked about her experience as a student and eventually becoming a professor while establishing herself as a fine artist.
Career Coffee Break is a program run by the Peer Counselors in the Peer to Peer Program in Pratt Institute's Office of Career Services. The Peer Counselors bring coffee to Pratt Alumni in their studio and interview them on what life is like after graduation.

If you are a Pratt Alumni and want to participate in this project, email success@pratt.edu and let them know how you take your coffee.

November 22, 2011

Peer Book Report: The Interior Designer's Guide to Pricing, Estimating, and Budgeting by Theo Stephan Williams



 The Interior Designer's Guide to Pricing, Estimating, and Budgeting by Theo Stephan Williams

As students at Pratt, design is a heavy component in our education. Regardless of major, most of the content of our class critiques is dictated by the level of creativity in the designs pinned up on the wall. For certain majors, though, design is only the beginning of what's required to be a successful industry professional. Interior design is a division of the market that is just as dependent upon project and budget management as it is on design. Williams' book not only drives this point home, but provides so much valuable information and aids, including:
  • Interviews with working professionals on their experiences and life lessons
  • Different formats of Budgeting and Estimation Forms
  • How to send out a Purchase Order or Work Change Order
  • Samples of how to keep Purchase Logs
  • Multiple sample contracts as well as contract advice
  • Client Approval Forms, as well as what they are and why they're important!
 To see other books in our library, see our collection at http://www.librarything.com/catalog/prattcareer.

November 21, 2011

Frances Waite & Lauren Smith, "Diluted", Two Person Show in the Alcove Gallery


  Review by Janine Sleem, History of Art and Design Graduate Student (2013)

         Memory, our ability to store and recollect, is shared. How well we are able to recollect them varies. Diluted, currently on view at the Alcove Gallery, is a collaborative exploration of memory and its recollection by first year student Frankie Waite and second year graduate student Lauren Smith.
Frances Waite, "Sister in the Water" 2011
   Waite captures intimate, candid family portraits, blurred, discolored and overexposed, as if snapshots from memory rather than film. The rocky cliffs and crystal waters of the Aruba coastline act as the setting for an unexpected transcendental experience, inviting us to peer into the sublime haze of figures in high places and deep waters.
             Old habits die hard for Waite, whose affinity for painting reveals itself in her photography. She takes to manipulating the medium as she does watercolor and ink, exposing the film to the sunlight and salt water rather than altering it digitally. The results appear to have been painted by the natural elements they portray. The exposure reveals both the vulnerability of the grainy film, and that of Waite's own memory. Waite reinforces the authenticity of the moment by allowing us to not only see the events unfold as she did, but to experience the blanks that her mind's eye and her camera's lens failed to capture and preserve.
            While the water is a trigger and an applied medium for Frankie Waite's memories and photographs respectively, for Lauren Smith, the ocean waves are the subject matter she attempts to remember and the culprit in denying her the ability to do so. Pixelated waters and white noise dilute the memories that Smith struggles to recapture.
Lauren Smith, "Untitled", 2011
            Smith, a New Forms major, focuses on projected video installations, including what she describes as 'memory videos', from which her sequence of exhibited images were taken. The videos are created by heavily editing existing films that correspond to her own recollected memories. Smith alters the videos, including the audio, exposure and lighting, timing, and sequence of frames to correspond to the process of evoking a memory. She then captured four images that best represent this process for the Alcove Gallery showing.
            Like Waite, Smith ventures into the realm of fading memories using the natural elements of the scene, an attempt to fill in the forgotten with the familiar; Waite through the use of the actual elements, and Smith through digital manipulation. Smith's work, however, exhibits a self-awareness that Waite's work does not, a realization that the image is only a temporary recollection, a realization that is met with a heavy resistance.
            Diluted addresses the very human concern of passing time, ephemeral memories, and ultimately, our own ephemeral existence.



This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.

Yiji Hong, "Something Between Nothing", Solo Show in the Fishbowl Gallery

Review by Sophie Buonomo, History of Art and Design Graduate Student (2013)
"Remains", 2010, gloves, canvas, charcoal powder

    Yiji Hong’s solo show, on view in the Fishbowl Gallery, is simple, spare, and conceptually lovely. A visitor to the Fishbowl Gallery might not even realize immediately that there is even a show on display – Hong’s work is quiet, and calls little attention to itself. However, this subtlety belies an energy and even a playfulness that becomes evident as one considers the work.

On display is the evidence of a performance called Vanishing (which will soon be in video form on her website, www.yijihong.com). In this performance, Hong shifts black powder from one sheet of paper to another. The effect is two-fold – first, the physical evidence of the shift (that is, a streak of black powder) remains on each sheet. Second, with each shift, there is less powder, and the marks become lighter and lighter. However, the powder never fully disappears, which, for Hong, represents the failure of the artist to fully transcend her materials.

Hong turns material into art, and the evidence of her artistic process becomes the artwork itself.  In the gallery, we encounter a bag of scrap paper, powder-blackened gloves, and a rusty lock box. In this lock box, hidden from our eyes, lays torn paper – the evidence of Hong destroying her art at the end of the process. For all of this conceptual gravitas, there is lightness in the physicality of the work - the delicateness of the powder, and the simple exploration of material interaction.

detail from "Container", 2010,mixed media
Hong describes her anxiety as an artist, which she feels     stems from the question: “how do I overcome the white sheet of paper?” The tension between an artist and her materials is nothing new, to be sure. Yet, Hong’s process, at once both meditative and witty, infuses this difficult and ancient relationship with an enormous amount of light.







 


Exhibition Photos by Lauren Smith

This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.




Kelly Mc Cafferty, "Trash Talk", Solo Show in East One Gallery

Review by Leigh Hurwitz, History of Art and Design/ Library Sciences Graduate Student (2012)

 
detail from "Stalagmite Stalactite", 2011, collage on paper
Ranging in size, but hovering around 6 ft x 3 ft, the five collages making up Kelly McCafferty’s current exhibit in East One Gallery vibrate with the strains of a choir of disparate voices.  McCafferty's background in abstract painting is clear in these compositions, made of paper, plastic, and bought/found items, all adhered to pink or white paper canvases, evocative of a grade school bulletin board.  But emotion, memory, and nostalgia are all refracted through the prism of colorful formalism.

Stopping short of fetishism, these collages make the case for objects themselves having a memory, a personal history.  There is a desolate sadness radiating around each one, from the anachronistic Roger Rabbit collector cards to the piece of tessellated Japanese paper with one small red stain. A codified arrangement of bisected shopping bags, musical silhouetted rabbits, already-peeled Sanrio stickers, and patterns of tape (caution, packing, duck, scotch) are aligned to suggest a record of…someone.  An alien finding consolation on an unfamiliar planet?  


  
detail from "Thanks a Bunch", 2011, collage
A post-apocalyptic anthropologist?  Or are these the rainbow residues of a teenage girl vomiting up a buffet of consumer culture, the proverbial assumption of feminine sweetness, and the unstoppable force of growing up? 

These are all my interpretations, however the true protagonist is actually the artist herself.  A scrapbook, a locker, an under-the-bed shoebox of treasures, are all containers that inspire this diaristic work.   So what was that chorus of lo-fi keening I heard emanating from each panel?  I think it was the crooning of each dislocated object, mourning its own loss and yearning for amnesia.


Photos by Lauren Smith




This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.









November 2, 2011

Lucia Oceguera, "Recollection", Solo Show in East One Gallery

Review by Clara Wanatirta, History of Art and Design Graduate Student (2012)



"Knot in Throat/ Nudo en la Garganta", 2011, video
The broad nature of New Forms opens up a door to endless possibilities. This is
certainly true for MFA student Lucia Oceguera’s exhibition, titled Recollection,
currently displayed at the EastOne Gallery on the first floor of the East Building.
Oceguera has faith in non‐traditional media such as the readymade and video,
seeing little boundaries to their capabilities as tools of expression. Her working
method is flexible, allowing her materials to speak and develop ideas into concrete,
multi‐layered manifestations shown in her final products.
Recollection displays Oceguera’s intention for the liberation of her materials. For
example, physical qualities such as image reflection, found in the mirror in Untitled,
and texture in the grey bricks used in World of Opposites may act as an element in
symbol making or simply play an aesthetic role.

The beauty of the open‐ended nature of Oceguera’s work lies in the fact that theviewer creates his/her personalencounter with each art piece. There is neither
duplication nor monotony as the elements that compose the different pieces
function as parts of a bigger whole as well as their individual entities.
EastOne Gallery as a makeshift artistic venue (the space is formally the Career
Services office) fits Oceguera’s display concept well. Not only are her artworks open
to interpretation, they also work better in non‐traditional exhibition where thereare no dedicated facilities as a support system; Oceguera’s installations work with
any given setting, creating new meanings wherever and however they are displayed.

"World of Opposites", 2010, painted bricks
To Oceguera, this pop‐up method for exhibiting her work allows her, through the
artworks, to enter a person’s personal space without being invasive or perhaps even
consciously acknowledged. Oceguera is thoughtful in integrating her work into
everyday spaces and people’s preset knowledge and experience, making her a
unique artist who produces installation‐based artworks that reach out to a wide
range of audience.




Exhibition Photos by Lauren Smith


This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.

October 31, 2011

Hwanyoung Jung, "Urban Solitude", Solo Show in Alcove Gallery

Review by Clara Wanatirta, History of Art and Design Graduate Student (2012)

The Student Affairs Office, doubling up its role as the Alcove Gallery, currently houses Hwanyoung Jung’s exhibition Urban Solitude. An MFA student majoring in photography, Jung’s work is highly influenced by artists such as Andreas Gursky, Thomas Demand and Thomas Struth, amongst many others.

Jung displays five large‐format landscape photographs of the built environment, creating an interesting dynamic with the setting of this gallery. The artist frames scenarios of disconnection between the human self and the manmade surroundings by isolating individuals against vast urban landscapes. Jung’s photographs suggests that the city can easily make a person conscious of his or her personal loneliness amidst a sea of strangers at any given moment of the day.

"Untitled" 2009, digital c-print, 30'' x 40''
Uncannily, perhaps, Jung’s photographs hang at the back of a few of the staff members of the Student Affairs Office, highlighting the reality of solitude as part of the daily life of city dwellers.

Concerned with the notion of the singular unit, and therefore solitude, as the essence of existence, Jung’s body of work in this exhibition reflects this thought through capturing the city landscape juxtaposed with the solitary individual and the nature being marginally accommodated by the concretes.

The artist admits that this idea drives most if not all of his thought process, and has undoubtedly directed his artworks towards this specific notion. However, he wishes for his audience to freely interpret his photographs and take away the parts that might have stood out to them. Jung facilitates this by printing in large size, exposing minute details that would otherwise go unnoticed in landscape compositions.

It goes to show that Urban Solitude is merely a fraction of Jung’s exploration of the individual. There is a progression of idea seen in this exhibition that promises further development. A comprehensive series of work perhaps await in the near future.



This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.


Sheena Dowling, "Inside Out" Solo Show in the Fishbowl Gallery

Review by Sophie Buonomo, History of Art and Design Graduate Student (2013)


 "Skin", 2010-2011, panty hose
Sheena Dowling’s Inside Out, on view now in the Fishbowl Gallery, is a work of grotesque beauty. Dowling twists, stretches, and sews found materials, such as nylons, ribbon and lace into objects that are at once abstract and deeply associative. These objects have an implied narrative – their stains and tears tell the story of human contact - and in most minds, an irrevocably female connection.

Dowling intends to question these associations, and her work explores the ambiguity of gender. When the nylons are sewn together, they create both phallic and leg-like shapes flowing in and out of each other, leading the viewer to a contemplation of the rigidity of gender construct. This ambiguity leads Dowling to describe her work as feminine, but not necessarily feminist. Bodily references - both male and female - play a large part in Inside Out. The stuffed and sewn nylons, contorted into tube-like shapes, resemble intestines and phalluses, while the stretched nylons are markedly skin-like. These associations are born out by the material, which has touched the most intimate parts of the body, only to be discarded. This refuse has absorbed not only the energy of the original owner, but of Dowling herself through the movement of her hand.
"Protection", 2011, panty hose,
 ribbon, fabric and wire

She describes the influence of Oceanic art, noting that ritual objects are often wrapped in fabric to give them unearthly power. She sees her stitching as an act of wrapping as well as a meditative process. Her intervention beautifies the process of decay, and prolongs the life of these discarded objects. Inside Out represents the artist’s simultaneous struggle with the ultimate futility of the preservative gesture and the universal fear of both human and material impermanence.



This exhibition is part of the Student Exhibition Spaces Program coordinated by the Center for Career and Professional Development at Pratt Institute.  All current students can submit work for inclusion in future exhibitions by emailing ccpdprograms@gmail.com for more information.

October 24, 2011

"Urbanized" Film Review




     As students in Pratt’s School of Art and Design we generally focus on creating things, whether buildings, products, art installations, or graphics. We create the object rather than the environment that defines it. Similarly, we overlook the role that design plays in the formation of our cities and communities. Everything - the width of the sidewalk, the design of each park bench, the infrastructure of every highway - has been designed. Gary Hustwit's third film in his Helvetica and Objectified design trilogy, Urbanized examines the cities we live in and how they shape our lives.


     The film features urban design projects in cities around the world, with commentary by leading architects, planners, politicians, and innovators. Hustwit's selection of projects provides inspiration beyond urban planning, relevant to most any field. For the Communications Design student, check out how the Tidy Street project generates awareness of energy usage through a street-wide information graphic. Fine artists can contribute to urban design as well-- Candy Chang’s work uses stickers to facilitate conversation within her community. Placed on abandoned buildings, passerby are encouraged to write what they wish was there. Housing developments in Mumbai show a positive way to accommodate growth through participatory architecture and interior design. As far as public infrastructure goes, the pedestrian pathways in Capetown demonstrate that effective urban design can lower crime and enhance the quality of life. 

     Within Pratt’s School of Architecture, students in City and Regional Planning, Environmental Systems Management, Facilities Management, and Urban Design majors consider such possibilities on a daily basis. These students, often overlooked by the general Pratt population, are actively involved in the development of our community. Check out their Sustainable Planning Blog to keep up with PSPD news (Programs for Sustainable Planning and Development). 
     No matter what your major is, Urbanized offers plenty of inspiration. The storyline weaves together urban development efforts from around the globe with awe-inspiring cinematography. Urban design aficionados may be disappointed by how the documentary skims over the intricacies of their field, but as with Helvetica and Objectified, the film isn't meant to be an in-depth report on the status of an industry. It merely intends to bring to light the design behind our daily interactions. In this it excels, highlighting that the structure of the city itself, more than any other factor, defines the lifestyle of its inhabitants. In Urbanized, Hustwit successfully draws attention to the influence of urban design on the city that evolves from it. 
 


**One last note: The film concludes with a shot of our dearly beloved G train!

October 11, 2011

Internship Success: Macy's


Danielle Ryan, Fashion Design 2012
Place of internship: Macy's Summer 2011

Danielle has always had an interest in market-driven, corporate fashion businesses, so when an opportunity to intern at Macy's Merchandising Group presented itself in May of 2011, she knew it was right. Interns choose from departments such as men's, women's children, accessories, loungewear, and home. Danielle found out more about the program in weeks leading up to orientation: it was a paid, 40 hour per week, 8 week-long internship program that included working closely with a design team daily and a special market-based side project for interns that would be presented to executives of Macy's. The best part is that a majority of interns are offered jobs for after graduation. It seemed like the most promising offer, so Danielle signed on with Alfani women's cut and sew knitwear from the beginning of June until the end of July.

Macy's Merchandising Group encompasses all of Macy's private brands, the labels that are designed within Macy's and placed on the salesfloor along side other brands that Macy's carries, such as DKNY, Tommy Hilfiger, and BCBGeneration. The total profits of private brands makes up about 20% of MMG's business, so it's a really great opportunity to design for them and bring the customer back to Macy's again and again.

The best part about Danielle's experience at Macy's, besides being paid, was getting to meet some of the top executives of Macy's, such as Terry Lundgren, Peter Sachse, and Jeff Kantor, and receiving their advice about being successful in the fashion retail industry. Also, at the end of the program, all of the interns get to choose a location at which they do community service. This is an important aspect of the Macy's company culture, which Danielle feels is important and says a lot about the people who work there. Danielle feels that Macy's really takes deep interest in interns as the future of their company and takes great care of them, from paying them to ensuring they do not work more than 40 hours each week. Another awesome aspect was that all of the interns are taken to New Jersey where the Macy's Parade Studio is located. They are given a personal tour of the facility and get to see the entire process of how the balloons and floats for all of the Macy's events are created. Finally, Danielle has made lasting connections and friendships with other students in many areas of fashion - buying, planning, merchandising, accounting, e-commerce - from schools around the country.
 
Danielle's best advice for a student seeking an internship: "In my department, we are often told to just intern in one specific area, such as specifically design, but it is extremely important to know every aspect of your industry inside and out, and today, people who will hire you are often looking for that person that has experience in everything - design, sales, merchandising, public relations, production, social media - and isn't afraid to try something new. As long as you're learning, there's no such thing as an unhelpful internship. Also, coming from a fashion major, ALWAYS dress professionally - people really do take notice and appreciate it. It shows that you care about your job and you take care of yourself."

October 7, 2011

Peer Book Report: Rethinking Curating: Art After New Media by Beryl Graham and Sarah Cook




Rethinking Curating: Art After New Media
by Beryl Graham and Sarah Cook New Media Art and Design encompasses so much of the content that artists are creating today from fine artists to designers. How people make art is rapidly changing, so why wouldn't the spaces in which we view it change as well? Rethinking Curating begins with an analysis of the New Media art form; how it started up and how it has changed. Part II explains the contexts, practices and processes of curating. Finally, Part III is dedicated to the author's conclusions bringing the two previous sections together. There are many examples dispersed throughout the body of the book, which provides good context to the material being discussed. This book is great for anyone involved in the curation processes, as well as the digital artists creating the works. In this book you'll find sections about:

  • Art After New Media: Histories, Theories and Behaviors
  • The Art Formerly Known as new Media
  • Space and Materiality
  • Rethinking Curating: Contexts, Practices and Processes
  • Curating in an Art Museum
  • Other modes of collaboration
To see other books in our library, see our collection at http://www.librarything.com/catalog/prattcareer.

September 30, 2011

Peer Book Report: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers




Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers by Linda Tain

The fashion industry is perhaps one of the most fast-paced and competitive industries in the world of design--it is also infamous as one of the harshest. As a fashion designer, your portfolio needs to stand out that much more from the rest of your peers. Linda Tain, a long time professor at FIT, and fashion designer, illustrator and consultant, knows this better than anyone, and she has put together this 3rd edition of what is a truly extraordinary guide to assembling an exceptional fashion design portfolio. Tain's exploration of the many different components to the fashion designer's portfolio is an informative, illustrative, and thorough guide for any designer wishing to enter (or re-enter) this job market. In this book, you can find:
  • examples of successful portfolio cases and content
  • specs on illustrative flats
  • examples and processes of presentation boards and mood boards
  • age and gender customer market guidelines
  • covers children's, activewear, knitwear, accessories, juniors, and men's fashion (along with women's)
  • tips for and examples of successful fashion illustration
  • sample markdown log sheets
  • interview tips and sample cover letters and resumes
  • FAQ section, glossary of industry terms, supply lists and sources/ brands list
To see other books in our library, see our collection at http://www.librarything.com/catalog/prattcareer.

September 22, 2011

Peer Book Report - Creative Careers In Museums




















Creative Careers In Museums - Jan E. Burdick
Everyone loves museums! And now everyone can work for a museum! Jan E. Burdick explains how museum jobs are not restricted to history majors, but open up opportunities for other professionals, ranging from photographers to graphic designers. This book is an excellent resource for anyone trying to get into the museum business or even just learn about the logistics of a museum. The highlighted feature of this book includes testimonies from working professionals from places such as, The Brooklyn Museum, talking about their own personal museum experiences. Burdick condenses this wide range of museum career information within a comfortable two hundred pages.
Other goodies include:
  • The history of museums
  • Information on specific types of museums
  • How to land a museum job
  • Finding a museum position that suits your fancy
  • Resources for professional associations, study programs, resumes, etc.
To see other books in our library, see our collection at http://www.librarything.com/catalog/prattcareer.


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September 8, 2011

Internship Success: PromaxBDA

Raymond Miller, Film 2011
Place of internship: PromaxBDA, promaxbda.org

During his senior year at Pratt, Raymond realized he had an interest in the advertising industry, but had no experience or knowledge of it. He decided to meet with a career counselor in our office and get some insight on where to begin, which is how he discovered PromaxBDA.

Promax is a non-profit, full-service association for promotion and marketing professionals working in broadcast media and advertising. Every year they hold a week long conference in New York City, which includes lectures, discussions, exhibits, screenings, and networking opportunities. Raymond was accepted to be a part of this conference, where he provided event support and hospitality, got to sit in on any event happening in the conference, and was provided housing, meals, and a stipend for the week.

Raymond says the best part about his internship experience was his opportunity to network and make contacts, as well as sit in on lectures and talks he never would have been exposed to otherwise. His advice for students seeking internships: There are lots of options if you know exactly what you want from an internship. Contact them and ask questions.

May 5, 2011

Peer Book Report: Children's Writers and Illustrator's Market




















2011 Children’s Writers and Illustrator’s Market edited by Alice Pope


This book is an excellent resource for both Writing majors and Illustration majors who are interested in pursuing careers in the Children’s and Young Readers’ Literature publishing market. It may be difficult to get published, but it’s not impossible, and this book provides the information and advice to accompany you on your publishing endeavors. Not to mention, the book itself is easy to navigate with its tab system on the pages’ edges.
Inside this book, you will find:
  • Listings, contacts and submission guidelines for Children’s Book and Magazine Publishers in the US, Canada, and other countries.
  • Articles and interviews from industry professionals giving tips, advice, and words of encouragement
  • Lists of contests, awards, and grant opportunities
  • Information on the benefits of group blogging
  • Online promotion and literary agents
  • Includes a free online subscription to WritersMarket.com for one year (updates on market
  • listings, industry news, databases, and record keeping tools)
To see other books in our library, see our collection at http://www.librarything.com/catalog/prattcareer.

April 27, 2011

The Braille Plate
















The Braille Plate, designed by Pratt 2011 grad Roxanne Phillips, was the winner of the Pratt Fishes Eddy competition and has been produced as the winning entry this year. The plate says, in Braille, ‘the sighted will never know: to touch words and have them touch you back.’ Not only is this an elegant design but one which gives the user pause and exposure to universal design.

The Braille plate will be on display at the Pratt Show and will be one of the gifts in the drawing from attendee business cards. VIP reception for industry professionals: May 10th 6– 9pm. Visit www.pratt.edu/show for tickets.

The Pratt Show
May 10th– May 13th
Manhattan Center
311 West 34th Street
New York, New York

Pratt Show 2011: Steffi Min














This block woodcarving inspired project from Industrial Design senior Steffi Min adds an artful elegance to any space. Steffi seeks to investigate how the craft of traditional Indian handmade goods can be translated into today's context through modern material and production. Her Mandala Bar (below) brings the design and concept beyond the home and into your own hands, adding a bit of beauty to your chocolate indulgence.

See more cutting-ed
ge work this year's top seniors in all areas of design at the 2011 Pratt Show. VIP reception for industry professionals: May 10th 6– 9pm. For tickets and more information visit pratt.edu/show

The Pratt Show
May 10th– May 13th
Manhattan Center
311 West 34th Street
New York, New York

April 26, 2011

Career Coffee Break: Michala Monroe


Michala Monroe: CAREER COFFEE BREAK from Peer to Peer on Vimeo.


Michala Monroe
Pratt Alumna, BFA in Interior Design, 2008
Check out Michala's website and blog

Michala Monroe is an interior designer in the Brooklyn area. After she graduated from Pratt, she established her Limited Liability Corporation, mmonroe design, and began freelancing. Within the past year, she expanded her clientele from the New York area to Texas where she designed for a corporate space. In this interview, she gave incredibly valuable information on starting a company and project management. Students from every major would benefit from hearing what she has to say. Thanks, Michala!

Interviewed by Christee Curran and Jenny Elfanbaum
Edited and Posted by Christee Curran

April 22, 2011

Career Coffee Break: Stuart Constantine


Stuart Constantine: CAREER COFFEE BREAK from Peer to Peer on Vimeo.
Stuart Constantine
Pratt Institute Alumnus, Masters of Industrial Design, 1995.
core77.com

We recently met with Stuart Constantine, a founding partner of Core77 (you may be familiar with core77.com and coroflot.com). He discusses the development of the company from concept to realization (it began as a thesis project in the early days of the Internet), and offers advice to Pratt students looking to break into the design industry. Be sure to check out his tips for managing an online presence, as well as the dos and don’ts of building a portfolio!

Interviewed by Jenny Elfanbaum and Raymond Miller
Edited and Posted by Jenny Elfanbaum

April 20, 2011

Pratt Show 2011: Q Kyu Seop Lee














Industrial Design senior Q Kyu Seop Lee combines the work of Isamu Noguchi with a familiar object most students appreciate and love, a pizza box. The result embodies the iconic simplicity
of Noguchi's coffee tables and maintains the accessibility and youthful quality associated with the pizza box. Q's side table is perfectly crafted to provide easy assemblage without any tools, and comes apart to fit inside the box of the top.

See more cutting-edge work from this year's top graduating seniors in all areas of design at the 2011 Pratt Show. VIP reception for industry professionals: May 10th 6– 9pm. For tickets and more information visit pratt.edu/show

The Pratt Show
May 10th– May 13th
Manhattan Center
311 West 34th Street
New York, New York

April 6, 2011

Pratt Show 2011: Kate McCreary & Ashley Landon











Need a break from your busy day? 'Walnut' (left) by Ashley Landon, designed to be sat in in the lotus position, offers a comfortingly natural place for a quick escape and a bit of meditation. The design offers yoga and meditation lovers an elegant alternative to the common yoga mat.

A perfect compliment for Ashley's 'Walnut' is Kate McCreary's tea shelf. Her thoughtful, organic design provides the perfect opportunity to show off that beautiful teapot hiding in your kitchen cabinet, complete with space for cups and any other tea accessory.

See more cutting-edge work from this year's top graduating seniors in all areas of design at the 2011 Pratt Show. VIP reception for industry professionals: May 10th, 6– 9pm. For tickets and more information visit pratt.edu/show

The Pratt Show
May 10th– May 13th
Manhattan Center
311 West 34th Street
New York, New York

Pratt Show 2011: Andrea Zeuner & Mayang Anggraeni














The last pair of jewelry previews for The Pratt Show come from Mayang Anggraeni (right) and Andrea Zeuner (left). Mayang's necklace has a certain fondness for any art lover with it's careful use of the beloved colored pencil. The color of the pencil combined with the grain of the wood brings a fun and unique quality to the piece. Andre's piece, however, is inspired by the contrast between how humans divide land and how nature divides land. Using brass, asphalt crack repair, and nickel she explores this relationship and their final marriage below the surface of the earth.

See more cutting-edge work from this year's top graduating seniors in all areas of design at the 2011 Pratt Show. VIP reception for industry professionals: May 10th, 6– 9pm. For tickets and more information visit pratt.edu/show

The Pratt Show
May 10th– May 13th
Manhattan Center
311 West 34th Street
New York, New York

April 1, 2011

Pratt Show 2011: Collin Velkoff


















Chaos at breakfast? These 'buds' offer an elegant solution for organizing cereals, milk, and sugar. Or anything else for that matter! Industrial Design senior Collin Velkoff incorporates a contemporary, interesting aesthetic in his design that other containers lack. We'd like to see these on the breakfast table, that's for sure!

See more cutting-edge work from this year's graduating seniors in all areas of design at the 2011 Pratt Show. VIP reception for industrial professionals: May 10th, 6– 9pm. For tickets and more information visit pratt.edu/show

The Pratt Show
May 10th– May 13th
Manhattan Center
311 West 34th Street
New York, New York

Pratt Show 2011: Bitna Joo




























We have another beautiful piece for you from the jewelry department seniors! This time from Pratt Show candidate Bitna Joo. Her pin, made from brass plated copper and lace, really demonstrations the delicacy and femininity of her work. Bitna describes her collection, this pin is just one of three, as a growth of herself and appreciation of life's compliments.

See more cutting-edge work from this year's graduating seniors in all areas of design at the 2011 Pratt Show. VIP reception for industry professionals: May 10th 6– 9pm. For tickets and more information visit pratt.edu/show

The Pratt Show
May 10th– May 13th
Manhattan Center
311 West 34th Street
New York, New York

March 30, 2011

Pratt Show 2011: Amanda Thong





















This innovative, versatile piece by Industrial Design senior Amanda Thong is for all the going green artists out there. Amanda transforms the red plastic cup, a staple to nearly every college student, into not only art, but art we can use. These smashed cups can be linked together to form different fun objects- a light, wall art, containers, or even a room divider.

See more cutting-edge work from this year's graduating seniors in all areas of design at the 2011 Pratt Show. VIP reception for industry professionals: May 10th, 6– 9pm. For tickets and more information visit pratt.edu/show

The Pratt Show
May 10th– May 13th
Manhattan Center
311 West 34th Street
New York, New York